The South Dakota Library Challenge: Electronic Resources Edition was developed by the South Dakota State Library staff to introduce you to the statewide subscription electronic resources. The Electronic Resources Challenge encourages library staff to learn more about the resources that provide expanded access to information and research tools to all schools, libraries and citizens of South Dakota. It is your chance to Explore...Discover...Play!...and Learn about the statewide subscription resources and how they can be useful to you both personally and in your library. This is an opportunity for you to learn at a pace that is comfortable for you and to share your learning experience with your colleagues in the South Dakota library community.

For more information about the Electronic Resources Challenge, check out our FAQ and Getting Started Pages. Please contact us if you have any questions.

Sunday, March 22, 2015

Lesson 9 -- History and Genealogy Resources—Ancestry Library, Heritage Quest and Sanborn Maps

With nearly 75% of Americans interested in family history and with history required in schools, genealogy and local history information is in demand. The State Library provides AncestryLibrary, Heritage Quest and Sanborn Maps as a link to the past to help students and patrons. These resources offer access to historical books, maps, census records, indexes and more. Be careful—once you start exploring, you might join the family history craze (if you haven’t already!)


AncestryLibrary contains over 4000 different searchable databases and indexes. In addition to census information, you can find historical maps, yearbooks and indexes. One of AncestryLibrary's best features is their continuous index updating and additions, so if you don’t find something today, check back in a few weeks. Here are ways to find out more--an overview handout provided by the SD State Library and a LibGuide reference page with videos, sample searches and help pages provided by AncestryLibrary. If you are new to genealogy, seeking specialized information or gotten stuck somewhere, AncestryLibrary provides tutorials in its Learning Center. Click the Learning Center tab at the top of the page to see the topics covered, including Research Guides.

Due to contract restrictions, AncestryLibrary is available only inside your library or school.

HeritageQuest is available inside the library and from home with a library card. HeritageQuest provides access to census information plus full text historical books, Freedman's Bank records and more. The State Library provides an overview handout, and HeritageQuest provides a LibGuide reference page with videos, sample searches and more. If you are new to genealogy, seeking specialized information or gotten stuck somewhere, HeritageQuest provides tutorials in its Learning Center. Click to choose a collection (such as "Search Census"). Then click the Learning Center tab at the top of the page to see the topics covered.

This handout provided by Proquest compares HeritageQuest and AncestryLibrary. This handout provided by Proquest compares the commercial version of Ancestry to the library edition. You may have seen the commercial version of Ancestry featured on one of Martha Stewart's shows and as the central research point in "Who Do You Think You Are?" Even "CSI" uses Ancestry! In their December 14, 2011 Las Vegas show, "Genetic Disorder," the victim is a genealogist, and investigators use Ancestry to help solve the crime. (Click here to read the blog post on how genealogy impacted the episode.)

The last historical resource we'll look at is Sanborn Maps. Check out historical fire insurance maps for 82 South Dakota communities. Established in 1867, the Sanborn Map Company was the primary source of fire insurance maps for nearly 100 years. Fire insurance maps were used to estimate the potential fire risk for urban structures. Depending on the community and building, one can see details such as construction materials and location of windows and doors. Other details can include street names, house numbers and building use. For example, the 1939 Hill City map indicates that the fire department is a volunteer department composed of 1 chief and 25 men.

Proquest provides complete information about navigating, understanding and using Sanborn Maps here. The original Sanborn Maps were color maps; the digitized image we see is black and white. A black and white legend is provided to correctly interpret the digitized maps. A link to the legend and search tips are provided when in Sanborn Maps. Sanborn Maps are available inside your library and at home with a library card.


Basic Discovery Exercise:

Create a blog posting discussing the following questions and other observations you have about AncestryLibrary, Heritage Quest and Sanborn Maps. All resources can be accessed via this alphabetical list.


1. Contrary to popular belief, you don't have to be dead to be listed in AncestryLibrary and can frequently find useful information in the U.S. Phone and Address Directories, 1993-2002. You may even find your marriage license. Search for your own name in AncestryLibrary and report the results.


2.  In AncestryLibrary, search for a grandparent or great-grandparent and see if you can locate them in the census.  Report your findings.


3.  In AncestryLibrary, type "South Dakota" in the location box and click Search. On the left side of the next screen is a link for Pictures.  Click Pictures, see what's there, and look at one or more. Report your findings. 


4. In HeritageQuest, there are over 28,000 family and local histories in their online historical books.  Search for a place or browse the publications.  Report back on something that interested you.

5. In Sanborn Maps, select South Dakota. Then select your town or a town with which you are familiar. Choose a date. Look at the first page containing the Index. Then navigate around the pages and see what you discover. Try to find a building on the map that is still in use today. Report your findings.

Advanced Challenge
1. You have heard that the Titanic had a sister ship or two and want more information, including a picture, if possible. You try AncestryLibrary's "Ship Pictures and Descriptions" collection. Report your search and your findings.

2. A student is working on a report about the dirigible, the Hindenburg, and comes to you for help. You try AncestryLibrary's Newspapers & Publications collection. What are your results?

3. Your county is celebrating a big anniversary, and townsfolk want some historical information. In HeritageQuest, which collection do you search? What are your results?

Common Core Connections
In Lesson 9, spend some time exploring AncestryLibrary, HeritageQuest, and Sanborn Maps. Consider how you would use each resource to meet a Common Core standard. (Common Core State Standards information is found on this page and in the right-hand sidebar. Current SD School Library Content Standards are here.)

In your blog post, name the standards and briefly and specifically describe the lesson(s) you will teach using the genealogy databases to help meet the standard. Either describe a lesson that uses all three of these resources or three separate lessons using one resource each.

Sunday, March 15, 2015

Lesson 8—WorldCat, CAMIO and More

This week we are looking at specialized resources that can help you find materials internationally, find full-text material on a variety of subjects and do art and image searching. The lesson is broken into three parts, one section for WorldCat, one for OAIster and one for CAMIO. Please do the Discovery Exercises for each, and see what you can find! WorldCat and the other indexes provided via FirstSearch. WorldCat is used for these main purposes:

Library Cataloging
  • Member libraries catalog their materials in WorldCat, which lets the rest of the world know what materials are where.
  • Librarians use WorldCat to find call numbers for books they are adding to their collections.
Finding materials
  • This is a great resource for finding materials not held in SD.
  • Many of these materials can be obtained through interlibrary loan.
WorldCat is an international catalog of member library materials. It contains over 179,000,000 records found in 72,000+ libraries, including the SD State Library & 25+ SD libraries. Records include a variety of formats from before 1000 BC to the present. Libraries add a new record every 10 seconds!

Most of what’s in WorldCat is NOT full text.

All the resources are linked on the State Library homepage and can be accessed via this alphabetical list. Scroll down to WorldCat. This is one of the few resources for which you will be asked for your username and password, whether you are in a school, library or at home. These should be your SD State Library database access barcode/password, your SD State Library card barcode/password or SDLN Member Library Card barcode/password. If you have questions about this, contact us via e-mail at julie.erickson@state.sd.us or jane.healy@state.sd.us.

If you need your password, you may call the State Library at 1-800-423-6665 (SD Only) or 605-773-3131.

The South Dakota State Library provides a two-page tutorial.  In addition, here is a link to an OCLC tutorial.


Basic Discovery Exercise part 1

Create a blog posting discussing the following questions and other observations you have about WorldCat.

1. We recommend using the Advanced Search screen for best search results. Click the “Advanced” tab on the toolbar 2nd to the top. In WorldCat, the right set of search boxes say “Keyword.” Click on the drop down menu to see other ways you can search.

2. Choose Title Phrase search, and click on the limiter (below the search boxes) “Books.” In the search box, type a book title. Note the number of results. How many libraries worldwide have item #1? Click the link. What is the top library?

3. Click into result #1 and look at the full record. What is the call number (class descriptor)? To see what else the author of your chosen book has written, click on the author's name. To see what else is available on that subject, click on a subject. What other information do you see?

Other FirstSearch Indexes

WorldCat offers access to other databases, too. These include indexes to books, articles, dissertations, archive material, and more. In WorldCat, these are found by clicking on the drop down menu next to “Search in database.” Most of these are very specialized, scholarly databases that are NOT full text, but they might be the perfect resource to get a piece of information. For information on each database, select each one and click on the “i” icon. This guide gives a chart with brief explanation of each database, its intended audience and its use.

Discovery Exercise part 2

The OAIster (pronounced “oyster”) database is one of the few mostly full text databases in WorldCat. Choose OAIster from the dropdown menu next to “Search in database.” In the “Keyword” search box, type South Dakota. Select one of your results. Click on the link next to “Access.” Add to your Lesson 8 blog posting by writing about your findings and your impressions of this tool.

Take a look at other participant's blogs and see how their experiences compared with yours.

Advanced Challenge

1. You want to know if it’s possible to borrow a non-fiction book about Martin Luther (NOT Martin Luther King) to use for a couple weeks with your 4th & 5th grade Sunday school class. You have nothing in your collection, so you check WorldCat. How do you conduct your search? (Try to use some of the special search features and limiters.) What title(s) would you recommend? What is the nearest owning library?

2. Your library doesn't have many graphic novels. You think adding classics that have been made into graphic novels would be beneficial. To see what's already in libraries, you check WorldCat. Describe your search terms and limiters. Name 1 title you would add and its publisher.

3. The local theater director would like to do My Fair Lady but is afraid the vocals may be too difficult for the available cast. She wonders if a vocal score is available so she can take a look at it. Describe your search terms and limiters. Give the Accession number of the item you choose (found at the bottom of the record, where it says "Accession: OCLC:").

Common Core Connections

In Lesson 8 in WorldCat, choose “Advanced Search,” type “common core state standards” in the search box, with quotation marks around the phrase. Farther down on the screen, find “Limit Type to:” and click the box next to “Books.” Click “Search” and look through the results. Click on a few titles to see if one is of interest. Then click “Libraries that own this item worldwide” to see where the item is held. If you would like to request the book and are not a librarian, please ask your librarian to request the book for you.

On your blog, report your experiences with this resource and how it may be useful to you in meeting Common Core standards. (Common Core State Standards information is found on this page and in the right-hand sidebar. Current SD School Library Content Standards are here.)

CAMIO

CAMIO stands for “Catalog of Art Museum Images Online.” It is a growing online collection containing works of art from museum collections around the world, including the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Walker Art Center, the Smithsonian Institution, the Library of Congress, and the Albert and Victoria Museum. It does not, however, contain images by prominent South Dakota artists because the owning institutes are not participating.

CAMIO covers cultures around the world from 3,000 B.C. to today. More than a collection of paintings, CAMIO includes art in the broadest sense from photos to sculpture to textiles to wood and silver and more. Researchers can start with a general search and then refine it by using the tools on the left toolbar.

Due to access restrictions, CAMIO is available only within schools and libraries, not from home. Works of art may be used for educational and research purposes, if they are properly credited. Images may not be published or otherwise distributed.

Because it is image-oriented, CAMIO and search results may take a little longer than usual to load. The South Dakota State Library has a two-page handout to provide information about CAMIO.

Discovery Exercise part 3

Basic Discovery Exercise

You will need to complete this exercise at your school or  library. CAMIO is not accessible from home. You can access CAMIO via this alphabetical list.

1. In the search box, type “Sioux.” Click on an image and notice what information is given and how you can manipulate the image. Blog about your results.

2. How would you and your community use this resource? What other observations can you make?

3. CAMIO has a lot of potential for personalizing and presenting research. Do a search on a subject of your choice. Choose 3 or 4 favorites by checking the box to the left of the image number. Click "Save to Favorites"on the toolbar at the top of the results next to "Relevance" and "Display Options." Then click "Favorites" in the gray bar in the upper right of the screen. On the left sidebar, click to export to PowerPoint or Zip Archive File. This allows you to manipulate and use the images in a variety of ways. Try out these features and report your findings.

Advanced Challenge

1. A student wants to do a project on the way people dressed in Charles Dickens’ England (the Victorian Era was from 1837-1901). What results can you find in CAMIO, and how did you find them? (search term hints: “dress” “fashion” “clothing”)

Common Core Connections

In Lesson 8, spend some time exploring CAMIO and its features. Consider how you would use this resource to support the visual element in Common Core areas of “Integration of Knowledge & Ideas” and “Presentation of Knowledge & Ideas” for your grade level and content area. (Common Core State Standards information is found on this page and in the right-hand sidebar. Current SD School Library Content Standards are here.)

In your blog post, name the standard and briefly and specifically describe the lesson you will teach using CAMIO to help meet the standard.

Saturday, March 7, 2015

Lesson 7 -- EBooks on EbscoHost (formerly NetLibrary)

Wouldn't it be nice to have a larger nonfiction collection at your library? EBooks on EbscoHost (formerly NetLibrary) provides all South Dakota libraries with an expansive non-fiction collection containing books on topics ranging from Kathy Ross's craft books to resume books to historical information about South Dakota. Other books include many classic novels, "Idiot's Guides," Cliff's Notes and more.

EBooks on EbscoHost books are limited to one user per book, so you may get an "item in use" message when you try to view a book. The books are released after 15 minutes of inactivity. The newest titles available in the State Library subscription are copyrighted 2006. The titles in the State Library subscription are not downloadable.

The South Dakota State Library provides a 2 page guide to EBooks on EbscoHost. Details and troubleshooting information are here.
To save titles, take notes and more, create your own EBooks on EbscoHost account.   You can set up an account if you are accessing inside the library or at home via barcode and password.

Basic Discovery Exercise:

Create a blog posting discussing the following questions and other observations you have about Ebooks on EbscoHost. All resources can be accessed via this alphabetical list. For best results when accessing EBooks on EbscoHost from home, close all browser windows and open a new window. You should need to type in your library barcode and password again.



1. Do a search for a topic that interests you. Note the default search is "Find all my search terms." You may want to change the search to one of the other options. Review your findings and observations.

2. Constitution Day is looming and several students need more material. Search EBooks on EbscoHost and recommend some appropriate titles.

3. A class is doing projects on Western history. They have exhausted the library's print collection. In EBooks on EbscoHost, click "Advanced Search." In the "Select a Field" box, choose "PB Publisher." In the search box, type "Nebraska" or "Oklahoma." Report your findings.

Advanced Challenge
1. Try out the “Advanced Search” feature. Click “Advanced Search” under the search box. Do a search on a topic that interests you, or search “South Dakota.” Play around with options and choose one title. Report your explorations and how you think patrons or students would like this feature.

2. You and your grandmother are talking about childhood books. She recalls enjoying a series of fairy tale books. Each one was a different color. Find these books in Ebooks on Ebscohost. Report your search process, the author and the titles you found.

Common Core Connections
In Lesson 7, spend some time exploring Ebooks on EbscoHost titles and topics. Consider how you would use this resource to meet a Common Core standard. (Common Core State Standards information is found on this page and in the right-hand sidebar. Current SD School Library Content Standards are here.)

In your blog post, name the standard and briefly and specifically describe the lesson you will teach using Ebooks on EbscoHost to help meet the standard.

Sunday, March 1, 2015

Lesson 6 -- Gale Virtual Reference Library

A patron asks, “What foods have zinc in them?” You scratch your head. Your library reference collection is small and outdated. Where do you turn?


A student needs literary criticism of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. He’s getting a late start on his project, and all the usual materials are already checked out. You go to a reference book only to discover that the desired pages have been torn out. Plus, kids really prefer online information. Where do you look?

Gale Virtual Reference Library (GVRL) solves both of these needs quickly. GVRL provides all South Dakota libraries and schools with a core reference collection that's accessible 24/7 to an unlimited number of users. GVRL contains selected multi-volume reference titles in many subject areas, including medicine, education, history, science and literature. Users can also search across the entire collection at once, frequently finding information in areas one wouldn't look. GVRL articles have "read speaker" technology, which allows every article to be read aloud or downloaded in MP3 format.

The South Dakota State Library provides a 2-page tutorial. Gale offers this 6 minute tutorial on the basics and this tutorial on searching and browsing, however the examples used in Gale's recording show titles that aren't included in the State Library collection. (Please note these training tools may take a few minutes to load.) More help is available by clicking the "Help Guide" on the GVRL homepage.

Basic Discovery Exercise
Create a blog post discussing the following questions and other observations you have about Gale Virtual Reference Library. All resources can be accessed via this alphabetical list.

1. Getting to know the titles in GVRL is similar to getting to know the titles of your library's reference collection. Click "Title List" on the upper right to view all the titles available in the collection. Click a book title of interest to you and access an article via the table of contents. Notice with the multi-volume titles, you can select which volume you look at. Discuss the title you selected and how you may use it.

2. At the top of the home page, type a search term in the search box. Search for answers to the two questions posed at the beginning of the post: zinc or The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn if you can't think of something else. Review the results, selecting an article to see what kind of information you can find. Test the "Listen" feature. Discuss your results.

3. Look at 2 or 3 other participants' blogs to see what they discovered. Comment if you like.

Advanced Challenge
1. Your civic organization is sponsoring a community event with the theme, “Spring Holidays Around the World.” The organization needs your help in finding the following: a. Spring festival traditions from a variety of countries b. Traditional spring festival foods and their recipes c. Spring festival games or pastimes Report your findings and how you found them in GVRL.

2. Use Advanced Search to find recently added 2012 and newer titles. Then explore a couple titles and report your findings.

Common Core Connections
In Lesson 5, on the GVRL home page, click “Education” on the “Subjects” in the left sidebar. Then search all the Education titles at once. Here’s how: in the upper right, search within “Education” for one of the following topics: “critical thinking,” “problem solving,” or “creativity.” Read at least two articles on the topic and discuss how what you read aligns with Common Core. (Common Core State Standards information is found on this page and in the right-hand sidebar. Current SD School Library Content Standards are here.)

In your blog post, name the standard and briefly and specifically describe the lesson you will teach using GVRL to help meet the standard.